Home News Ceremony Practice Lecture Reference About Us Contact Audio Visual Book Reviews SHINTO Practical Wisdom for the Modern World
GROUND BREAKING
Ground Breaking Ceremony The Ground-breaking ritual is a traditional Japanese ceremony to be performed before the construction of a new building. The Japanese name is Ji Chin Sai, which literally means the pacification of the grounds. The local kami, which are seen as guardians of the area, are invited to be present in an evergreen tree - or its symbolic paper form: the himorogi - and to commune their blessings and benefits with the people who are gathered on the purified place. It is an event to join the beneficial power of the ever- renewing nature, realizing a world of peace and balance, aiming at justice and happiness, and creating a sense of safety and protection.   In order to prepare the arrival of the kami in a pure place, the shinto master performs purification rites. He addresses the kami in the jichinsai norito, expressing gratitude and respect for the kami, asking for safety during the construction works and praying for health and prosperity for the users of the new building. One of the highlights of the ceremony is the moment when the most important representatives will “break the ground” by cutting grass on top of the mountain with a sickle, removing rocks with a hoe, and digging the ground with a spade.
200 hectares of agriculture in Czech Republic are transformed into industrial zone. The ground-breaking ceremony aims to restore harmony with nature.
Dutch Shintomaster has performed the ceremony of JiChinSai for many (Japanese) companies all over Europe 1987 Vierwindenhuis, Amsterdam, the Netherlands more..... 1995 Kikkoman, Hoogezand-Sappemeer, the Netherlands more..... 1996 Panasonic Matsushita Pilsen, Czech Republic more..... 2003 Hi-Bis (Honshu, Mitsui & Co, Bayer Material Science) Bitterfeld, Germany more..... 2008 FujiFilm, Tilburg, the Netherlands more..... 2008 Amvest IJburg, Kira Moriko architect, Amsterdam, the Netherlands more..... 2009 Sakura Finetek, Alphen a/d Rijn, the Netherlands more.....   
© 1981 JAPANESE DUTCH SHINZEN FOUNDATION